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Advanced B Complex – 180 caps

$59.99

B complex is a popular supplement used to increase energy levels and overall metabolic function.

Product Description

On Sale while supplies last!
Company:   AOR
Size:   180 caps.

  •  Prevents age-related collagen degeneration
  •  Maintains cellular energy production
  •  Supports the function of the brain and nervous system
  •  Contains the most effective forms of B vitamins

AOR’s Advanced B Complex was the Bronze winner of the Alive Awards for best multivitamin and supplement!
ADVANCED B COMPLEX was designed to provide the most advanced forms of B vitamins in the most scientifically discerning ratios available.  These nutrients help metabolize carbohydrates, proteins and fats for energy and support tissue and red blood cell formation.

NPN Product Code Size Per Capsule Vegetarian
80025646 AOR04167 90 Vegi-Caps 602 mg Vegetarian
80025646 AOR04206 180 Vegi-Caps 602 mg Vegetarian
Supplement Facts
Serving Size: 3 Vegi-Caps
B1 (Benfotiamine) 100 mg
B2 (Riboflavin-5-phosphate sodium) 7.5 mg
B3 (Niacin – from 388 Inositol Hexanicotinate)  353 mg
B5 (Pantethine, Calcium d-Pantothenate) 300 mg
B6 (Pyridoxal-5-phosphate) 100 mg
B12 (Methylcobalamin) 1000 mcg
Folic Acid (calcium L-5-MTHF) 1000 mcg
Biotin 500 mcg
Choline bitartrate (provides 240 mg of choline) 600 mg
Inositol (from Inositol Hexanicotinate, Inositol)  393 mg†
†85 mg from Inositol Hexanicotinate, 308 mg from Inositol. Non-medicinal ingredients: microcrystalline cellulose, dicalcium phosphate, silicon dioxide, sodium stearyl fumarate. Capsule: hypromellose, chlorophyll.

AOR Guarantees: that no ingredients not listed on the label have been added to the product. Contains no wheat, gluten, corn, nuts, peanuts, sesame seeds, sulphites, mustard, dairy, soy, eggs, fish, shellfish or any animal byproduct.

Adult Dosage: Take 1 capsule one to three times daily with food, or as directed by a qualified health care practitioner.

Cautions: Consult a health care practitioner for use beyond 8 weeks. People with thiamine hypersensitivity should not take this product.

Pregnancy/Nursing: Consult a health care practitioner

Main Indications:

  • Aging
  • AGE Inhibitor
  • Brain Support
  • B Vitamin Deficiency
  • Diabetic Neuropathy
  • Diabetic Complications
  • Stress
  • Energy

The B-complex is an officially recognized grouping of eight essential vitamins. Some sources dispute that number, claiming that there are in fact nine or ten (or more) vitamins within the B-complex, yet within most official, academic, and scientific circles, the number is generally accepted as eight, and these are:

• Vitamin B1 (thiamin)
• Vitamin B2 (riboflavin)
• Vitamin B3 (niacin)
• Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid)
• Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)
•Vitamin B7 (biotin)
• Vitamin B9 (folic acid or folate)
• Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)

There is a great deal of biological activity for which this group of vitamins is responsible, and there is also a great deal of overlap between the respective functions of each vitamin in the B-complex family. However, most of the overlap is centered around the metabolism of the three macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fat). Other tasks more specific to certain members of the B-complex group of vitamins include support for the brain and central nervous system, the growth and development of red blood cells, the maintenance of healthy skin and muscle tone, immune function and hormone activity. Metaphorically speaking, the B-complex family of vitamins can be described as the ‘transmission fluid’ of the complex automobile that is the human body.

Vitamin B1 (a.k.a. thiamin): Thiamin is required to convert glucose and amino acids into energy as well as to develop red blood cells and maintain muscle tissue. Thiamin is converted by the body into its active coenzyme form thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP). TPP is a catalyst for pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme responsible for the conversion of pyruvate into the all-important acetyl-CoA, which is central to the Kreb’s Cycle that in turn generates cellular respiration. In ‘underdeveloped’ countries, B1 deficiencies are usually found where foods made from white flour are staples. In the ‘developed’ world, where such foods are often fortified with thiamin, the main reasons for deficiencies are alcohol consumption (which impairs thiamin absorption) and poor dietary choices. The most serious deficiencies can lead to degenerative nerve disorders such as beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, diseases also common among chronic alcoholism.

Thiamin deficiency has also been linked to Type II Diabetes, particularly in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which occur at an abnormally high rate among diabetics. Simply put, AGEs are cellular proteins that are damaged as a result of being exposed to glucose without the mediating action of a co-enzyme. Increased AGE occurrence is also commensurate with the aging process. Benfotiamine is a lipid-soluble form of thiamin that has been shown in studies to be 5 times more bioavailable than regular thiamin. In fact, clinical trials have demonstrated that benfotiamine can improve nerve function by 30% and decrease nerve pain by 50% among diabetics.

Vitamin B2 (a.k.a. Riboflavin): While playing a role in the energy metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, B2 is particularly active in skin and vision health. B2 has long been used as an adjunct in the treatment of neonatal jaundice and has recently been added to anti-migraine protocols as well. Ariboflavinosis is the specific condition caused by riboflavin deficiency and its symptoms include sores around the mouth and swelling of the throat, cheilosis (cracks on the lips), and glossitis (inflammation of the tongue).

Vitamin B3 (a.k.a. Niacin): The derivatives of B3 form the basis of the oxidized and reduced forms of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide (NAD+ and NADH). The interaction between these coenzymes forms part of the basis (along with the aforementioned acetyl-CoA) of the Kreb’s cycle, generating cellular respiration and energy in the form of ATP. B3 also plays an essential role in DNA repair, removing toxic chemicals from the body, and assisting in hormone production. Niacin is also effective at inhibiting the release of low-density lipoproteins (or LDL [bad] cholesterol) into the blood from the liver, making it a treatment of choice for hyperlipidemia.

Deficiency in B3 (combined with a deficiency in the essential amino acid tryptophan) can lead to a disease known as pellagra, characterized by deramatitis, insomnia, diarrhea, weakness and progressive dementia. Most niacin supplements are in nicotinic acid form, which has been associated with a ‘flushing’ effect, an unpleasant warming and itching of the skin when taken at significant doses. Inositol hexanicotinate is a form of niacin that is free of this effect.

Vitamin B5 (a.k.a. Pantothenic acid): B5 is needed to form coenzyme A (later becoming acetyl-CoA), which is central to cellular respiration and energy production. Vitamin B5 has also been shown to have a positive effect on cholesterol levels, including lowered total and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels.

Vitamin B6 (a.k.a. Pyridoxine): Vitamin B6 is most commonly known as pyridoxine, but in fact B6 is comprised of three organic forms, namely pyridoxal, pyridoxine, and pyridoxamine. Each represents a different stage in the body’s metabolism of this important vitamin. Pyridoxal-5′-phosphate, or P5P, represents the advanced stage of this metabolism, the stage at which B6 has been converted into a coenzyme, a catalyst for at least 113 known essential enzymatic reactions in the body. These include the metabolism of all endogenous amino acids, including such particularly crucial ones as tyrosine, glutamine, cysteine and glycine. P5P is also important for the proper metabolism of essential fatty acids as well as the formation of red blood cells and neurotransmitters, making P5P a factor in optimal cognitive function as well. Notable features of the latter include the fact that P5P is required to convert tryptophan into serotonin as well as to release glucose from glycogen.

Indeed, a deficiency in vitamin B6 can lead to anemia, depression, dermatitis, hypertension, elevated levels of homocysteine and water retention, insomnia, premenstrual tension, irritability, muscle twitching, convulsions, and kidney stones. B6 has been successfully studied for its ability to enhance the immune system and alleviate the symptoms of autism, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), anemia, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), hyperhomocysteinemia and other conditions. While the aforementioned studies used conventional B6 supplementation (mainly pyridoxine hydrochloride), it must be remembered that only the P5P converted from pyridoxine can be used for nitrogen and protein metabolism and heme synthesis. This underlines the potential for P5P in supplement form, especially in cases where the body’s ability to synthesize it from its organic B6 forms is compromised in any way. In fact, it was found that in patients with impaired liver function, only 33% responded to pyridoxine hydrochloride supplementation with an increase in plasma P5P, where as all of the patients receiving P5P supplementation experienced an increase.

Vitamin B12 (a.k.a. cobalamin): Vitamin B12 has distinguished itself among the B-vitamins with the volumes of research attributable to its specific effects on neurological health. B12 is also very important to the methylation cycle. The successful studies with B12′s neuroprotective and neurogenerative benefits were conducted with the methylcobalamin (the active coenzyme) form of B12.

Vitamin B9 (a.k.a. folic acid or folate): Folic acid is needed for the synthesis of new red blood cells (which carry oxygen throughout the body) and DNA. Folic acid is often prescribed during pregnancy, as it reduces the risk of neural tube defects such as spina bifida in the fetus. A deficiency can also lead to megaloblastic anemia, a specific form of anemia caused by the inhibition of DNA synthesis in red blood cell production, as well as elevated levels of homocysteine.

Vitamin B7 (a.k.a. biotin): Biotin is another B vitamin that is involved in the metabolism of protein, carbohydrates and fats, and finally, although not strictly a vitamin, choline is an essential nutrient that is often grouped with the B-complex.

Choline & Inositol
Choline, a nitrogen-based organic compound that is found in the lipids of cell membranes, is a member of the B-vitamin family without a numeric designation. It plays an important role in the structural integrity of cells as well as in the movement of essential lipids across cell membranes, in important metabolic processes and in the synthesis of the key neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Inositol was also once considered a member of the b-vitamin family but now is not since the body can produce it. It is an important component of structural lipids and signaling molecules.

In summation, the B-complex family of vitamins is essential to processing and disseminating the fuel required to keep the evolutionist miracle known as the human body in constant operation. Maintaining the proper intake of this group of vitamins is indeed essential for keeping that operation as optimal as possible for as long as possible.

Research

A study that investigated the role that B vitamins play in mitigating the effects of occupational stress on the body found that after individual differences in personality and work demands were statistically controlled, the vitamin B complex treatment groups reported significantly lower personal strain and a reduction in confusion and depressed/dejected mood after 12 weeks.

The study examined for the first time the efficacy of 3 months administration of two forms of high dose vitamin B complex on mood and psychological strain associated with chronic work stress. The results of the study are consistent with two previous studies examining multivitamin supplementation and personal (non-work) feelings of strain and suggestive of significant decreases in the experience of workplace stress after 90 day supplementation of a B multivitamin. Sixty participants completed the 3-month, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial in which personality, work demands, mood, anxiety and strain were assessed.  Given the direct and indirect costs of workplace stress, these findings point to the utility of a cost-effective treatment for the mood and psychological strain effects of occupational stress.

The coenzyme form of B vitamins makes them readily available to the body and is an advantage for those that are not able to convert regular B vitamins into their more active forms. Many people can benefit from the use of B vitamins; however certain groups such as the elderly, those with a liver disorder, who have poor nutrition or who have certain illnesses may experience significant benefit. This form of vitamin also works longer in the body and provides a lasting metabolic energy source.

AOR Advantage

AOR offers the most potent B complex available on the market. One of the significant differences between AOR’s Advanced B Complex and other formulas is that the B vitamins are in the optimal dosages in order for them to have a potent effect in the body. Each of the B vitamins is in its co-enzyme form making it accessible for the body to use immediately.